ESP8266 – Witty Cloud Module

Most pins are in use

Most pins are in use

The ESP8266 is an interesting chip, I mentioned it here several times (sorry: mostly german). In a short description, it’s a freely programmable microcontroller. Compared to Arduino & Co., it’s a real number cruncher. The ESP is faster, has more memory, and the best thing: it has builtin WiFi. You’ll find more information all over the network, a basic overview is contained in Wikipedia.

I tested several boards when playing with this chip. Today, I want to describe one that goes with the name Witty Cloud.

Basically, it’s a board with an ESP-12-F, a USB connector that delivers power, a little pushbutton, a LDR (Photoresistor) and a RGB-LED. So there’s plenty of hardware to play with. When you buy the module, you receive a stack of two PCBs. The lower one has a second USB connector, which is equipped with a serial converter. So it’s not only used as a power source, but also as a programming and debugging interface. Furthermore, there’s a reset- and a flash-button on the lower board. After programming, you just need the upper board, and you can even send newer firmware versions to it over the air (OTA).

The  lower board is only used for programming

The lower board is only used for programming

Stacked like this, the module costs less than three Euro, you just need a USB cord and a compiler to start programming. I suggest using the Arduino IDE, it’s very easy to use, even for beginners. After installation of the ESP8266 extensions, it’s best to select WeMos D1-Mini in the board manager, this way everything works fine.

Unfortunately, it’s not easy to find proper documentation for the Witty. So i scribbled the picture above, at first to have some kind of reminder for myself. So the pin labeled GPIO13 is connected to the blue channel of the RGB-LED, in the Arduino environment it’s called D7.

Label Pin (Arduino) Purpose
REST Reset
ADC A0 Analog input, connected to LDR
CH_PD Chip Power-Down
GPIO16 D0 GPIO, freely usable
GPIO14 D5 GPIO, freely usable
GPIO12 D6 GPIO, green channel of RGB-LED
GPIO13 D7 GPIO, blue channel of RGB-LED
VCC +5V power
TXD TX Serial interface
RXD RX Serial interface
GPIO5 D1 GPIO, freely usable
GPIO4 D2 GPIO, connected to pushbutton
GPIO0 D3 GPIO, connected to flash-button, not really freely usable
GPIO2 D4 GPIO, connected to blue LED on the ESP-Module
GPIO15 D8 GPIO, red channel of RGB-LED
GND Ground

I would be highly interested in a circuit of the board, and if you have any corrections or suggestions: just let me know.

Mein Fazit: ein echt interessantes Board. Wer mehr GPIO braucht sucht vielleicht lieber nach einem NodeMCU, wer sowieso einen LDR oder eine RGB-LED braucht sollte zugreifen. Ich habe mittlerweile einige davon hier, und eine Firmware mit der ich die Dinger hier im Haus verteilen möchte ist auch fast fertig.

Oh, das Bild habe ich übrigens mit einer Grafik aus diesem Projekt gemacht, das ist die Witty Cloud für Fritzing.

2 comments

    1. The sensor really is just a sensor. If you want to connect any kind of lamp, you’d do that on the GPIO-Pins.

      There’s plenty of information about that on the internet, I’m sure you can find help if you do a proper search. Good luck!

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