H801 Wifi in case

H801 Wifi in case

I don’t remember how I found this, but a while ago I ordered one of these modules from china. It’s called H801Wifi, and it’s sold for nine Euros. There’s also an app that controls the lamps from a phone, but I didn’t even bother to test that.

Two years ago I built a project that runs by the name of IRlicht (I was sure that I published it at that time — seems that I still have to). It does almost the same: it controls the brightness of LED strips. My own projekt does that on four channels: RGBW. Red, green, blue and white. This device controls RGBWW, meaning that it would be possible to attach for example a warm and a cold white strip, in addition to the RGB one.

My DIY-one is controlled via infrared remote control. This module is driven by an ESP8266, so it works in a WiFi network. I’m fooling around with a firmware for small WiFi-devices for a while, that communicates with the MQTT protocol. This module would be a great platform to use it on. It’s just questionable if it’s possible to get my own firmware to this off-the-shelf-device…

Turns out: yes. It’s possible. :-)

Flash-jumper set, connected to serial

Flash-jumper set, connected to serial

I’m not the first one to try that. Andreas Hölldorfer did it, and he wrote about it. I didn’t expect it to be that simple. Almost disappointing… ;-)

On the PCB — and thanks to great photos in most of the offering shops I knew that ahead of the purchase — is a well labeled serial interface. And right next to that is a connector that literally wants a jumper to be set on it. When the jumper is set, it’s possible to flash a new firmware over the serial interface. Right from the Arduino IDE. I just connected my USB-serial-interface between computer and the module (without connecting external power to it, I don’t know if that would have damaged anything), and I configured the module in the IDE like this:

  • Board: “Generic ESP8266 Module”
  • Flash Size: “1M (64k SPIFFS)
  • Upload Speed: “1152200”

After connecting RX and TX in the right way, I was able to upload my firmware.

I mentioned to have an almost fully working firmware for my use, based on the excellent Homie for ESP8266 framework. ‘Almost’, because till now it just does RGB, not RGBWW. But the only thing I had to adapt for using RGB on this device instead of my usual hardware were the IO-Pins. The “Generic ESP8266 Module” header file doesn’t know any readable names for the pins, so I had to use the numbers. Andreas Hölldorfer already found out the mapping, though it seems that he’s got a different revision of the hardware. This worked for me:

Pin Function
15 Output red
13 Output green
12 Output blue
14 Output white 1
4 Output white 2
1 Internal LED green / Signal
5 Internal LED red / Power

I like that, after initial flashing the OTA-Update (Over The Air) works. This way, I could already close the box again. All further updates will be uploaded over the air. :-D

Most pins are in use

Most pins are in use

The ESP8266 is an interesting chip, I mentioned it here several times (sorry: mostly german). In a short description, it’s a freely programmable microcontroller. Compared to Arduino & Co., it’s a real number cruncher. The ESP is faster, has more memory, and the best thing: it has builtin WiFi. You’ll find more information all over the network, a basic overview is contained in Wikipedia.

I tested several boards when playing with this chip. Today, I want to describe one that goes with the name Witty Cloud.

Basically, it’s a board with an ESP-12-F, a USB connector that delivers power, a little pushbutton, a LDR (Photoresistor) and a RGB-LED. So there’s plenty of hardware to play with. When you buy the module, you receive a stack of two PCBs. The lower one has a second USB connector, which is equipped with a serial converter. So it’s not only used as a power source, but also as a programming and debugging interface. Furthermore, there’s a reset- and a flash-button on the lower board. After programming, you just need the upper board, and you can even send newer firmware versions to it over the air (OTA).

The  lower board is only used for programming

The lower board is only used for programming

Stacked like this, the module costs less than three Euro, you just need a USB cord and a compiler to start programming. I suggest using the Arduino IDE, it’s very easy to use, even for beginners. After installation of the ESP8266 extensions, it’s best to select WeMos D1-Mini in the board manager, this way everything works fine.

Unfortunately, it’s not easy to find proper documentation for the Witty. So i scribbled the picture above, at first to have some kind of reminder for myself. So the pin labeled GPIO13 is connected to the blue channel of the RGB-LED, in the Arduino environment it’s called D7.

Label Pin (Arduino) Purpose
REST Reset
ADC A0 Analog input, connected to LDR
CH_PD Chip Power-Down
GPIO16 D0 GPIO, freely usable
GPIO14 D5 GPIO, freely usable
GPIO12 D6 GPIO, green channel of RGB-LED
GPIO13 D7 GPIO, blue channel of RGB-LED
VCC +5V power
TXD TX Serial interface
RXD RX Serial interface
GPIO5 D1 GPIO, freely usable
GPIO4 D2 GPIO, connected to pushbutton
GPIO0 D3 GPIO, connected to flash-button, not really freely usable
GPIO2 D4 GPIO, connected to blue LED on the ESP-Module
GPIO15 D8 GPIO, red channel of RGB-LED
GND Ground

I would be highly interested in a circuit of the board, and if you have any corrections or suggestions: just let me know.

Mein Fazit: ein echt interessantes Board. Wer mehr GPIO braucht sucht vielleicht lieber nach einem NodeMCU, wer sowieso einen LDR oder eine RGB-LED braucht sollte zugreifen. Ich habe mittlerweile einige davon hier, und eine Firmware mit der ich die Dinger hier im Haus verteilen möchte ist auch fast fertig.

Oh, das Bild habe ich übrigens mit einer Grafik aus diesem Projekt gemacht, das ist die Witty Cloud für Fritzing.